News and updates from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

Celebrating Frank Lloyd Wright’s Genius at Kirkland Museum of Fine and Decorative Art

Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation | Jul 29, 2022

Stuart Graff, President and CEO of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, to lecture on the expression of unity in Frank Lloyd Wright’s designs at Kirkland Museum.

As part of Kirkland Museum of Fine and Decorative Art’s celebration of the genius of Frank Lloyd Wright in 2022, Stuart Graff, President and CEO of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, will lecture on the expression of unity in Frank Lloyd Wright’s designs on August 3rd, 2022 at 6:30 p.m.

Join us live in Denver or stream the lecture online by purchasing tickets here!

Member tickets cost $25 while general public tickets costs $35. Please consider becoming a member of Kirkland Museum to receive the discount for this lecture and future events

Formal Dinnerware designed 1916–1922 by Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) for the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, Japan, ceramic. Collection Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art, Denver. Photo by Wes Magyar.
Lamp composed of art glass pieces designed 1903–1904 by Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959), glass with copper-plated zinc caming. Gift of Louis Newman and Justin Ferate; Collection Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art, Denver. Photo by Wes Magyar.
Cabaret Dinnerware designed 1916–1922, modified c. 1933, by Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) for the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, Japan, ceramic. Collection Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art, Denver. Photo by Wes Magyar.

Working from models found in nature, Frank Lloyd Wright’s design philosophy centered on the ideas of continuity and integration between building and landscape, interior and exterior, form and function, to create a beautiful and even spiritual experience of “being.” In doing so, Wright strived to create a Gesamtkunstwerk, which means “total work of art,” in his architecture through unified and simple design, contrasting from contemporary and highly decorative efforts to achieve the same impact found in the Art Nouveau, Jugendstil and Secession movements, among others.

Dining Chair designed 1951 by Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) for the Charlcey and Gabrielle Austin House “Broad Margin” in Greenville, SC, cypress wood with cloth and needlepointed cushion. Collection Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art, Denver. Photo by Wes Magyar.

Peacock Chair designed 1921 by Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) for the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, Japan, oak with cloth upholstery. Collection Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art, Denver. Photo by Wes Magyar

This upcoming lecture, “A Total Work of Art: The Expression of Unity in Frank Lloyd Wright’s Designs,” supports Kirkland Museum’s exhibition, “Frank Lloyd Wright: Inside The Walls,” on view now through January 8th, 2023.

News and updates from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation